Fly tying tips and tricks: “How to prep tying material that contains a center cord, to prevent excess bulk.”

Chenille is a commonly used material when it comes to woolly buggers, a fly in which I tie by the dozen since you can fish them all year. But materials like this with an inner thread cord can create a bulking issue when tying in without prep.

An inner cord means its a separate material that is wrapped around a cord or thread which is when wrapped around the hook. Estaz and chenille are common center corded materials. If you are currently having this trouble here’s a quick tip that will eliminate that problem.

First let’s take a look at what happens when you tie it in without any modification.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

How to groom the cord for a clean tie in.

Prepping the material is as simple as stripping the outer fibers from the cord. Lets take a closer look:

Working with corded material

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

That’s it! Keep in mind, this technique isn’t limited to only chenille. Over time you will find that many other materials; contain a center cord that you can benefit from by prepping them first, such as cactus chenille and estaz.

Working with chenille.
Working with chenille.

Patterns using Chenille

Low water woolly bugger

2 Comments on “Fly tying tips and tricks: “How to prep tying material that contains a center cord, to prevent excess bulk.”

  1. Pingback: PHWFF: December 14, 2016 – The Low Water Wooly Bugger – The•Quilted•Tyer

  2. Pingback: PHWFF December 14, 2016 – The Low Water Wooly Bugger – The•Quilted•Tyer

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: