Tag: Fly Tying Patterns

P.H.W.F.F. Meeting Recap- August 23, 2017: The tying contest and a surprise for Harry!

As the deadline approached for the fly tying contest being held by P.H.W.F.F. itself, the guys unanimously decided that the low-water woolly bugger was their fly of choice. After working on the entries which were to be mailed shorty after, the guys presented Harry with a flag and a plaque in honor of his service

Fly tying tips and tricks: “How to prep tying material that contains a center cord, to prevent excess bulk.”

Chenille is a common material used when it comes to woolly buggers, a fly in which I tie by the dozen since you can fish them all year. But materials like this with an inner thread cord can create a bulking issue when tying in without prep.

An inner cord means its a separate material that is wrapped around a cord or thread which is when wrapped around the hook. Estaz and chenille are common center corded materials.

If you are currently having this trouble here’s a quick tip that will eliminate that problem.

First let’s take a look at what happens when you tie it in without any modification.

Material Talk: Articulated Wiggle Shanks

The first time I thought about tying something with an extended body I tried to cut the ends off of my hooks, and after a few sticks to my fingers, not to mention the waste of money.. I gave up.

So when I came across these small articulated shanks I was thrilled and began using them for flies that I wanted to give a little more movement to.

Articulated Wiggle Shanks to put it simply, are a long shanked hook without a point that can be used to give a lifelike movement to your flies without having to sacrifice a hook. They can be used to tie a variety of patterns, such as the Pompadour Iso Emerger and the Wiggle frenchie. The only limit is your imagination! They can also be used for bigger nymphs such as stone flies and hellgrammites.

On The Vise Q & A: “How do I use the wiggle shanks?”

I have had quite a few questions in regards to the Isonychia Wiggle Emerger, and the best way to tie with the Flymen Fishing Company-Articulated Wiggle Shanks so I decided to keep this part in a separate post, so that you can refer back to it as needed.

“How do I tie on them? They’re too long. Should I cut them first?”

Affixing a shank in your vise

Trying to tie on a shank when its fully extended in the jaws of your vise, may prove to be somewhat aggravating. Not to mention you can easily lose track of the final length that you are looking to accomplish with the body. Tying with it already cut is harder to do, since you need the extra length to hold into the jaws while you tie. I recommend that once you decide on the length of the PHYSICAL body (not the tails that may be hanging loose on lets say a pheasant tail) that you keep only that amount of shank showing.

June 7th, 2017: Ridge & Valley TU Presentation

I would like to thank the Ridge & Valley TU Chapter for inviting me to tie a few patterns for some of their members on June 7th, 2017. I demonstrated the Renegade dry fly and the Isonychia Wiggle
Emerger.
Both step-by-step tutorials can be found by clicking the links to the fly names above. It was a great time and I hope that you were able to take something away from the demonstration, that you will be able to apply to your own tying.

It’s awesome when you have a whole room engaged and everyone discussing different aspects of patterns; as we all can learn different things from each other. There is a wealth of knowledge out there and to be able to share what I know with others, is what always makes this so much more enjoyable.

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