Tag: Fly Tying Patterns

On My Vise: Isonychia Wiggle Emerger

The Isonychia is a decent sized mayfly that can be so numerous at times, you simply aren’t sure where to cast. There have been plenty of times at dusk where I see more trout taking emergers than I do the mayflies that are aimlessly drifting on the surface, when the hatch is in full swing. Some trout will even come barreling our of the water to take them as they rise and swim through the water column.
Some of them do make it, and the evidence can be found strewn all around the river bank where they had once climbed up onto the rocks to finish their transformation.

The next time you’re in the middle of an Isonychia hatch; try to divert your eyes away from the far bank for a few seconds, and look down. Concentrate on what is right in front of you at your feet. If you stand still, gazing into the water as it swiftly passes, you will see the nymphs. They are almost breaking dancing as they head down river! Many of them do not make it to adulthood, they become stuck in the film.
That is where this pattern comes in handy, and its for two reasons. When dead drifted tied just the way it is, it gives a little movement. A little extra attention grabber as it passes the eye of a hungry trout. Then after the fish have destroyed it to the point that your CDC bubble is ruined? Let it sink and swing it! It will wiggle and thrash around with those broken CDC fibers and continue to work.

The ‘Reel Wing’ Rusty Spinner

The “Reel” wing rusty spinner

Fly tying tips and tricks: “Taking the fear out of working with ‘Reel Wings’ Spinner wings”

A few years ago I picked up a package of Reel Wings at Dette Trout Flies and while I was super excited to use them once arriving home; I found that I broke more of them than I was able to use properly.
I tried and tried again, but after becoming frustrated, I put the few that I had left in the drawer, and honestly.. like many other materials before them.. I they were forgotten about.

Until I was made aware that they had revamped the packaging and material; for ease of use and durability!

So If you were like me, and had a little bit of trouble getting the hang of this material in the past; have no fear! Take a look at this step by step and the improvements made and I’m sure you will be running to the shop to pick some up, and wont be afraid to use up the old ones as well.

On My Vise: “The Bass Agitator”

Finally use the bodkin to position your eye over the area in which you want to place it. Slide it off the bodkin and repeat on the other side. Then push firmly on both together, basically just squeeze them at the same time to lock them down.

PHWFF April 26, 2017 Meeting Recap – Michael takes over the evening with an Adams! ..or Gray Wulff..? or.. comparaduns..? or..”

I couldn’t make it to our April 26th meeting but our newest volunteer Michael Signorelli took over for me and the guys had an awesome time!

“We had a full house at the April 26th meeting, which took place a few days before our trip up to the Upper Delaware system. The guides told us to tie up some Adams in preparation. But, guess what, we tied some Gray Wulff variations instead. It was perhaps a fitting choice, since Lee Wulff created the fly in the Catskills almost 90 years ago. The group learned a few tricks when it comes to tying wings on a Wulff. [As we progressed through the steps, some of the tyers morphed the pattern into Comparaduns, Bombers, and even a Neversink Skater.] It was a very productive session that turned out a few very decent flies. Spirits were high at the end of the night. And the trip up to the Catskills promises to be a classic. ” -Michael Signorelli

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