Tag: Fly Tying Patterns

PHWFF February 22,2017- Meeting Recap for New City, NY: “Rod Building, A Speech by Bill , Charlie’s Flies and a new volunteer!”

Our PHWFF New City meeting on February 22, 2017 was a busy one!
Half the room was filled with participants who were working on their rods for the Competition and the other half was set up for our fly tying group.

Leave room for The Renegades!

While we often find ourselves up late at night, coffee in hand, trying to create flies that imitate the exact naturals, so as to bring those picky trout to our nets. But we must not forget about another group of flies; flies that become such fun to tie and fish once they grace our memory with their existence again. Flies which merely suggest movement or a commotion on the waters surface, flies that only mimic the insects ‘footprint’ on the water but never really imitating the physical carbon copy of that food source.

We have seen this work time and time again with a Griffiths gnat, the Usual and a White Wulff, but they aren’t the only great attractor patterns. The Renegade is absolutely one of those! This fly was developed somewhere around the late 20s early 30s, and still catches trout today.
When I first started fishing The Renegade I didn’t know it had a name. It had actually found its way to me, during one of my first trips to the Catskills. I saw it hanging on a low tree branch on the bank of the Beaverkill, still attached to a few inches of sun-faded tippet. The hook was bent and had begun showing signs of rust around the eye. Yet at the time, I remember thinking.. “.. if they fished it here maybe it will work here?” (HA! If only that was true of every fly we tied on!) Nevertheless I took it home, dismantled it and tried my best to copy it on my vise.

That wet fly proved to be quite effective on many trips as I continued to tie and fish it.

‘Orange’ you glad it’s Monday? No? Then maybe a few of my favorite hot spots will help to cheer you up.

Some of my favorite orange attractors

“The Smallmouth Sparkle Grub”

My favorite smallmouth pattern!

On The Vise Q&A: “Jig/Slotted Beads: The proper way to fit them on the hook.”

I tie on jigs a lot, so much so that it’s become almost automatic when reaching for a hook. They are great for nymphing, will sink deep with a tungsten bead and extra weight under the body and ride with the hook point up on a tight line. Translating into less hangups as you are high sticking through the riffles.

Not to say that I dont still use standard nymph hooks with brass beads when I am going to be fishing skinnier water, and need to opt for something lighter that wont barrel straight down through the water column; It’s just that I cant seem to keep myself away from them.

While I may never really know what it is that makes them so attractive to look at, what I do know, is that one question I am asked the most when demonstrating or tying At a show, is:

“How do I get those slotted beads to sit right?!? It doesn’t work. What am I doing wrong?”

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